Wednesday, August 8, 2018

What does Unitarian Univeralism teach about sex?

What does Unitarian Univeralism teach about sex? So many religions focus intensely on sex and try to control the sexual behavior of its members. What's the big deal?

The big deal about sex is its procreative power. Sex creates new life. It is a power that human beings share with Creation. Further, sex is about assuring the continuation of our species. Sexual behavior is built into human beings biologically to serve the evolutionary destiny of our species in the universe.

Sexual behavior is often pleasurable but not always and it can be abusive, violent, and deadly. Unitarian Universalists covenant together to affirm and promote not only the inherent worth and dignity of every person but also justice, equity, and compassion in our human relations.

Good sexual behavior is about human attachment, bonding, and connection. Sexual behavior aspires, at its ideal, to enact the third principle of Unitarian Univeralist covenant which is to accept one another and encourage spiritual growth. There is no greater experience in human life than to love and be loved. Sexual behavior, beyond being procreative, is the facilitation of the joyous experience of human life born from deep bonding and attachment. Genuine, authentic sexual behavior is covenantal at its core. The two become one flesh as it says in the Bible.

Too often sexual behavior is erotized and the sexual partner is seen as an object to be used for the fulfillment of one's desires. This engagement in sexual behavior denies the inherent worth and dignity of the other and interferes with the experience of the holy to be found in human relationship.

Unitarian Univeralism does not teach that sexual behavior is sinful. Sexual behavior can be misdirected, mistaken, hurtful and harmful, and it can also be fulfilling, enjoyable, and facilitative of human growth and health. Unitarian Univeralism promotes the right use of sexual behavior and guides its members and others in its covenantal enactment in loving relationships.


2 comments:

  1. Thank you for a wonderful explanation.

    ReplyDelete